SOLUTIONS

Explore the most promising new technologies, tools, and ideas for addressing our planet’s greatest sustainability challenges.

For the residents of the world’s most iconic desert, including fennec foxes, it will take grit and perseverance to weather a challenging suite of threats. Fortunately, those are two traits the desert dwellers have in abundance.

photo essay | 05.13.19

Spirit of the Sahara

photo essay | 15.13.19

Spirit of the Sahara

Successfully raising a single infant is challenging enough that gorillas rarely have twins. But both of these babies are thriving, thanks to a few extra helping hands.

spotlight | 05.13.19

Hands Full

spotlight | 55.13.19

Hands Full

Hundreds of new dams are currently planned for Central American rivers, posing a threat to Indigenous peoples and wildlife. Preserving the integrity of these corridors between mountains and sea will help them both.

photo essay | 04.09.19

Free-Flowing, For Now

photo essay | 10.09.19

Free-Flowing, For Now

One of the world’s largest birds has long been persecuted for both its outsized bill and its eating habits, but an ambitious cross-border plan is helping this threatened pelican bounce back.

spotlight | 04.09.19

Below the Bill

spotlight | 09.09.19

Below the Bill

Restoring native crustaceans along West Africa’s Senegal River may be a critical step in controlling one of the world’s deadliest tropical diseases.

video | 03.17.19

Protected by Prawns

video | 23.17.19

Protected by Prawns

Africa's rarest carnivores face mounting threats from disease-carrying domestic dogs, but scientists hope a new vaccination campaign will give Ethiopian wolves a fighting chance at survival.

photo essay | 02.27.19

The Last Wolves

photo essay | 24.27.19

The Last Wolves

After a case of mistaken identity, scientists double down on their efforts to save a fabled fish.

article | 02.07.19

Resurrecting the Greenback, Take Two

article | 08.07.19

Resurrecting the Greenback, Take Two

Australia’s corals may get all the headlines, but the country’s kelp-dominated temperate reefs are at least as important and imperiled. Now they're finally getting the restoration focus they deserve.

photo essay | 01.25.19

The Unsung Reef

photo essay | 26.25.19

The Unsung Reef

As China prepares to unveil its brand-new national park system, the country—and the world—holds its breath to see how conservation will play out under this authoritarian regime.

article | 12.18.18

Green Glove, Iron Fist

article | 57.18.18

Green Glove, Iron Fist

In Bangladesh, a bat-borne virus you've probably never heard of is poised to become the next pandemic—and medicine alone may not be sufficient to stop it. Is an ecological intervention the answer?

article | 12.12.18

The Reservoir

article | 39.12.18

The Reservoir

In western Washington, the Tulalip Tribes bet big on beavers.

article | 11.22.18

They Will Build It

article | 27.22.18

They Will Build It

Peruvian chefs and Amazon dwellers hope the answer is yes—and that the path to salvation will be sabroso.

article | 10.23.18

Can Wild Foods Save the Amazon?

article | 19.23.18

Can Wild Foods Save the Amazon?

A quest to record a quiet frog’s call may mean the difference between its survival and its extinction.

video | 10.09.18

Sounds of Survival

video | 36.09.18

Sounds of Survival

To help corals survive the myriad threats they currently face, an international team of scientists is mastering the art and science of raising coral babies.

immersive | 09.26.18

Spawning an Intervention

immersive | 39.26.18

Spawning an Intervention

Against all odds, two Kurdish scientists are fighting to create a peace park in the heart of the Middle East.

article | 09.11.18

Patience, Peace, and Persian Leopards

article | 08.11.18

Patience, Peace, and Persian Leopards

Kangaroo Island’s iconic animals are orphaned all too often by speeding cars. But a dedicated group of volunteers is working to save as many survivors as possible.

spotlight | 08.28.18

Raising Joey

spotlight | 02.28.18

Raising Joey

From climate change to a border wall, the oft-overlooked but vital scrubland plants in South Texas face myriad threats. To save them, this self-taught naturalist is taking matters into his own hands.

article | 08.15.18

Borderland Rebellion

article | 54.15.18

Borderland Rebellion

Some Tasmanian devils have taken a surprising turn in response to a devastating cancer, offering new hope for the endangered species' survival.

photo essay | 07.31.18

All Eyes on the Devil

photo essay | 36.31.18

All Eyes on the Devil

Battling rising seas and creeping asphalt, scientists race to save two endangered species.

article | 07.18.18

Butterflies in the Storm

article | 04.18.18

Butterflies in the Storm

Creating protected areas is a critical first step, but reaping their benefit requires more than lines on maps.

opinion | 06.26.18

Fulfilling a Promise

opinion | 42.26.18

Fulfilling a Promise

“The Destroyer” is decimating bat populations across North America. But scientists are finding rays of hope.

article | 06.26.18

Glimmers in the Dark

article | 41.26.18

Glimmers in the Dark

Despite myriad threats, some coral reefs are thriving, or rebounding, suggesting it may be far too early to write the obituary for these critical ecosystems.

article | 05.23.18

Picture of Health

article | 29.23.18

Picture of Health

Cuba’s sustainable farming practices could provide a recipe for restoring struggling coral reefs around the world.

photo essay | 05.08.18

Farm to Reef

photo essay | 04.08.18

Farm to Reef

As the world’s marine ecosystems face ever-increasing threats, is the trend toward huge, remote reserves a promising new development or a worrisome distraction?

article | 04.10.18

A Drop in the Ocean?

article | 34.10.18

A Drop in the Ocean?

A decades-long debate over protection of the lesser prairie-chicken could usher the Endangered Species Act into a new era.

immersive | 03.13.18

A Grand Experiment on the Grasslands

immersive | 43.13.18

A Grand Experiment on the Grasslands

After more than 30 years, genetically engineered salmon may be coming to a store near you. Is that good or bad news for the planet?

article | 02.13.18

One Fish, Two Fish, Strange Fish, New Fish

article | 06.13.18

One Fish, Two Fish, Strange Fish, New Fish

With the threats of poaching and deforestation mounting, some start-ups are taking a high-tech approach to the world’s most pressing conservation issues.

article | 01.30.18

Tech Support for an Ailing Planet

article | 03.30.18

Tech Support for an Ailing Planet

In Mongolia, the conflict between preserving wilderness and conserving culture is coming to a head.

article | 12.19.17

When Reindeer Can’t Roam

article | 36.19.17

When Reindeer Can’t Roam

Can the cattle industry be remade to save the Amazon rainforest?

article | 12.13.17

Better Beef

article | 56.13.17

Better Beef

As New Zealand’s odd “owl parrot” climbs toward recovery, its ultimate survival hinges on a nationwide effort to eradicate millions of invasive predators.

photo essay | 11.14.17

Kakapo Comeback

photo essay | 14.14.17

Kakapo Comeback

New Zealand has an ambitious plan to wipe out invasive predators. Can the island country pull it off in time to save its iconic native birds?

article | 11.14.17

Eradication Nation

article | 13.14.17

Eradication Nation

In today’s world, solutions-based science and environment stories aren’t just a pleasant diversion—they’re a critical step toward a healthy future for our species.

opinion | 11.07.17

Life Stories

opinion | 37.07.17

Life Stories

Tracking dogs and their Maasai handlers are helping to keep wildlife and people safe in northern Tanzania—and word is spreading.

photo essay | 10.24.17

Where the Dogs Lead

photo essay | 21.24.17

Where the Dogs Lead

A new approach aims to help nature persist even as a city creeps outward.

article | 08.23.17

Connecting—and Protecting—the Dots

article | 47.23.17

Connecting—and Protecting—the Dots

Prison sustainability programs can bring science to the sentenced and their findings to the world.

article | 07.26.17

Conservation Meets Corrections

article | 32.26.17

Conservation Meets Corrections

A spectacular aggregation of whale sharks brings good fortune to Indonesian fishermen—and attracts ecotourism dollars that may be the key to their survival.

photo essay | 07.18.17

Good Luck Sharks

photo essay | 57.18.17

Good Luck Sharks

To curb climate change, step one is imagining a sustainable future; step two is figuring out how to pay for it.

opinion | 06.20.17

Embracing Hope—and a Carbon Tax

opinion | 15.20.17

Embracing Hope—and a Carbon Tax

To protect a rare Central Asian goat—and the snow leopards that depend on it—conservationists are turning to an unlikely ally: trophy hunters.

article | 06.13.17

Shoot to Save

article | 12.13.17

Shoot to Save

Facing new threats—including illegal marijuana grows—the fate of this little-known mammal hangs in the balance.

video | 05.23.17

Forgotten but not Gone: The Pacific Fisher

video | 13.23.17

Forgotten but not Gone: The Pacific Fisher

This innovative new approach to land and ocean management in the Bahamas proves that economic prosperity and ecological health can go hand in hand.

article | 05.16.17

Model Island

article | 38.16.17

Model Island

An ex-soldier of fortune takes up the fight to protect one of the world’s most heavily persecuted creatures.

conservation hero | 05.09.17

A Noble War

conservation hero | 01.09.17

A Noble War

A blood-sucking mite is wreaking havoc on honey bees—but scientists have discovered a surprising new way to fight back.

video | 04.25.17

Can Mushrooms Save the Honey Bee?

video | 15.25.17

Can Mushrooms Save the Honey Bee?

With human-wildlife conflicts on the rise across East Africa, Kenya’s iconic predators find some unlikely allies.

photo essay | 04.11.17

Lion Guardians

photo essay | 07.11.17

Lion Guardians

Renowned sustainability expert shares ideas for addressing food shortages in Africa without compromising the health of ecosystems.

brilliant ideas | 03.14.17

How to Feed Africa Sustainably

brilliant ideas | 15.14.17

How to Feed Africa Sustainably

This little bee was listed as endangered in January, but its status now hangs in the balance once again.

video | 03.07.17

Forgotten but not Gone: The Rusty Patched Bumble Bee

video | 55.07.17

Forgotten but not Gone: The Rusty Patched Bumble Bee

Feeding the world sustainably—and nutritiously—may require crops that most people have never heard of.

article | 03.07.17

Ancient Crops Find New Life

article | 55.07.17

Ancient Crops Find New Life

The Amazon rainforest faces myriad threats. But this iconic ecosystem—one of Earth’s most important natural resources—may be more resilient than scientists ever expected.

immersive | 02.28.17

The Lungs of the Planet

immersive | 11.28.17

The Lungs of the Planet

It’s more than a skirmish over funding, censorship, and “alternative facts.” It’s a battle for basic decency, the people we love, and the future of our planet.

opinion | 02.14.17

The War for Science

opinion | 32.14.17

The War for Science

Unreported catches limit our ability to manage fisheries sustainably—but not in the way you might expect.

opinion | 01.31.17

The Catch with Unreported Fish Catches

opinion | 00.31.17

The Catch with Unreported Fish Catches

An endangered Texas salamander hangs on thanks to a grab bag of protective laws. But will rampant development and a Trump administration spell its doom?

article | 01.24.17

A Fragile Balance

article | 54.24.17

A Fragile Balance

Agricultural entrepreneurs want to solve the planet’s livestock-feed crisis by farming insect larvae. Will their scheme fly?

article | 01.18.17

Maggot Revolution

article | 18.18.17

Maggot Revolution

Ecuador's Yasuní National Park may be the world's richest rainforest. What will become of it now that oil extraction has begun?

photo essay | 01.10.17

Breaking Precious Ground

photo essay | 16.10.17

Breaking Precious Ground

Clearcutting ancient trees in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest makes little sense—ecologically, climatically, even economically. So why is it so hard to stop?

article | 12.20.16

Old-growth Logging's Last Stand?

article | 06.20.16

Old-growth Logging's Last Stand?

What's a community to do when outside forces and ecological realities threaten the very industry on which it's built?

article | 12.20.16

Life After Timber

article | 05.20.16

Life After Timber

It took decades to hammer out a landmark conservation deal to save Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest. Now the real work begins.

article | 12.06.16

How to Save a Rainforest

article | 45.06.16

How to Save a Rainforest

What we don't know may be just as important to setting effective conservation priorities as what we've already discovered.

opinion | 11.29.16

The Species We Have Yet to Meet

opinion | 03.29.16

The Species We Have Yet to Meet

As the trees at the heart of America’s western wilderness are dying, ecologists are trying to grow their way out of the problem.

article | 11.15.16

The Seed Savers

article | 17.15.16

The Seed Savers

How the next president responds to the world's environmental challenges will determine the fate of our world for centuries to come.

opinion | 11.08.16

American Leadership for a Sustainable Future

opinion | 41.08.16

American Leadership for a Sustainable Future

Wielding narrative power in global politics when things are dying… or dead

opinion | 11.01.16

An Ecologist’s Guide to Writing Obituaries

opinion | 55.01.16

An Ecologist’s Guide to Writing Obituaries

Biological pesticides, from bacterial toxins to fungi delivered by bees, are a hot trend in agriculture. But harnessing nature is no easy task.

article | 10.25.16

Unearthing Nature’s Pesticides

article | 31.25.16

Unearthing Nature’s Pesticides

An impossible challenge, but one that’s critical to the fish, the ecosystems in which they live, and the humans who depend on them

article | 10.04.16

Counting Fish

article | 14.04.16

Counting Fish

Unlocking the ecological secrets of one of the planet’s most important salmon fisheries—and the specter of industrial development that threatens its very existence

article | 09.20.16

The Nursery

article | 32.20.16

The Nursery

We see so many troubling stories about the environment that the good news often comes as a surprise. But there’s more to be hopeful about than many people realize.

opinion | 08.30.16

No Lost Cause

opinion | 27.30.16

No Lost Cause

A mysterious disease afflicting California sea lions is helping scientists understand the causes of cancer in all animals—including humans.

article | 08.23.16

Cancer at Sea

article | 14.23.16

Cancer at Sea

The latest conservation conflicts pit one species against another. To save an iconic bird in the Pacific Northwest, the government is taking no chances—and no prisoners.

article | 08.17.16

Owl Wars

article | 45.17.16

Owl Wars

As we look for ways to prevent the world’s latest mosquito-borne disease, eliminating the mosquitoes themselves may not be a sustainable solution.

opinion | 08.17.16

The Zika Challenge

opinion | 45.17.16

The Zika Challenge

Both native and invasive—protected and reviled—western junipers are a living contradiction.

article | 08.09.16

The Tree that Ate the West

article | 13.09.16

The Tree that Ate the West

A new and deadly fungus could wreak havoc on America’s salamanders if—or when—it arrives on U.S. shores.

article | 07.26.16

The Devourer

article | 34.26.16

The Devourer

An elusive predator returns to Europe’s mountains, helping restore nature’s balance. A French photographer stalks the Eurasian lynx.

photo essay | 07.19.16

Return of the Ghost Cat

photo essay | 38.19.16

Return of the Ghost Cat

Now more than ever, we must all quickly learn—and live by—the lessons our living world can teach us.

opinion | 07.19.16

Learning the Lessons of the Planet

opinion | 37.19.16

Learning the Lessons of the Planet

The fate of the Southeast's longleaf pine forests, and the endangered woodpeckers that depend on them, may rest in the hands of the U.S. military.

article | 06.28.16

The Birds and the Bombs

article | 12.28.16

The Birds and the Bombs

Nature could soon be imperiled by twice as many vehicles and enough new roads to encircle the planet more than 600 times.

opinion | 06.14.16

Curbing an Onslaught of 2 Billion Cars

opinion | 19.14.16

Curbing an Onslaught of 2 Billion Cars

Jonathan Foley argues that there's never been a more critical time to embrace the lessons that natural history can teach us.

opinion | 05.17.16

Remembering the Stories of Nature

opinion | 24.17.16

Remembering the Stories of Nature

Without the efforts of conservation heroes, one of the most heavily trafficked animals on the planet might go extinct—before you even know it exists.

photo essay | 05.10.16

Taking Pangolin off the Menu

photo essay | 42.10.16

Taking Pangolin off the Menu

To protect rhinos from poachers, conservation workers have taken to the air to move these massive animals quickly and efficiently to safer ground.

spotlight | 05.10.16

Rhino Relocation

spotlight | 42.10.16

Rhino Relocation

For nearly a quarter century, a local marine biologist has been fighting for Haiti’s environment. It’s finally paying off.

article | 04.26.16

Conservation Hero: Jean Wiener

article | 47.26.16

Conservation Hero: Jean Wiener

The world’s rarest cats are rebounding in Russia, thanks to the creation of a new national park.

article | 04.26.16

Land of the Leopards

article | 39.26.16

Land of the Leopards

Rice fields for migratory birds—a look at California’s latest pop-up trend.

article | 04.26.16

Wetlands on Demand

article | 35.26.16

Wetlands on Demand

Burmese pythons are slowly, inexorably eating their way through Florida’s small birds and mammals. Is hunting them the answer?

article | 04.26.16

The Problem with Pythons

article | 33.26.16

The Problem with Pythons

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